government information

Lecture at UofT: Disturbing developments in digital government

If you find yourself in Toronto on Friday, February 6th, be sure to register for and attend this event on digital information management in Canada.

Click here to learn more and register.

Disturbing Developments in Digital Government
Professor David Brown will speak about concerns in digital information management in Canada.

Digital technologies have dramatically increased government’s ability to collect, use, re-use, store and disseminate information. The federal government has made clear its intention to move towards digital information management, yet its efforts thus far have lacked coherence. Causes for concern are plenty: from the deterioration of the Access to Information and Privacy regime, to the shutdown of government depositories and libraries, to collection and surveillance activities in the name of national security, to the hyper-centralization of government communications, and the foundering of the Open Data initiative. Prof. Brown’s lecture will examine the state of digital information management in Canada, and what we can expect going forward.This event will be moderated by Professor Ian Clark.

///

David C.G. Brown is an Assistant Professor in the School of Political Studies in the University of Ottawa. After studying at the University of Toronto (BA, MA in political science), he spent a career in the federal public service, working in the Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, the Department of External Affairs, Privy Council Office, the British Cabinet Office, Treasury Board Secretariat and the Canada Customs and Revenue Agency. Among his Treasury Board Secretariat responsibilities he was for four years Executive Director, Information, Communications and Security Policy. After working in the Public Policy Forum, an Ottawa-based think tank, he completed a PhD in political science at Carleton University in 2011. From 2012-14 he was a SSHRC Post-doctoral Fellow at the University of Ottawa. For several years he chaired the international committee of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada and later was a member of the executive committee of its international counterpart, the International Institute of Administrative Sciences (IIAS), including three years as IIAS President.

Advertisements

Call for chapters: Government Information in Canada

Changing technology and the policies that drive it have radically altered the government information landscape in Canada. It’s time to document the context, tools, and techniques used to produce, acquire, organize, preserve, and access government information in Canada. We intend to do this via an edited book with the working title Government Information in Canada and encourage you to contribute to this project.

In the space of ten to twelve chapters, we expect to provide a platform for practitioners to present overviews, comparative studies, research papers, and case studies on these potential topics (note that individual topics may be combined into a single chapter):

  • High level historical overview, bridging the gap between Bishop’s 1981 Canadian Official Publications (Oxford) and the present.
  • Recent structural changes and current state of major federal systems:
    • departmental libraries
    • Depository Services Program
    • Library and Archives Canada (government collections only)
    • Canada’s Open Government Initiative
  • Overview of provincial publishing, depository systems, and access structures
  • Digital developments
    • digitization
    • digital curation and preservation
  • Communities of Practice
    • library associations, conferences, Government Information Day
    • advocacy and advisory committees

Please submit a 300 to 500 word abstract about the chapter you wish to submit, noting the proposed title of the chapter and authors, to Sam-Chin Li before April 1st, 2015.

 

Important dates:

Intent to submit: April 1st, 2015

Notification of Acceptance: June 1st, 2015

Full Chapter Deadline: December 1st, 2015

Review Results to Authors: April 1st, 2016

Revised Chapter Due: June 1st, 2016

Note: publisher to be secured by May, 2015

 

Web page: https://sites.google.com/a/ualberta.ca/wakaruk/research/cfp2015

 

Editors:
Amanda Wakaruk
Government Information Librarian
University of Alberta Library
Amanda.wakaruk@ualberta.ca

Sam-chin Li
Government Information Librarian
University of Toronto Libraries
Samchin.li@utoronto.ca

CLA responds to the Canada’s Draft Action Plan on Open Government 2.0 Consultation

The CLA believes that access to the widest variety of information and points of view is critical to the functioning and evolution of a democratic society. Citizens, organizations, and governments make better, more informed decisions when they take part in a free exchange of ideas facilitated by open, affordable, equitable, and timely access to information.

It is with such values in mind that CLA responds to the Government of Canada’s Action Plan on Open Government 2.0 Consultation, with specific recommendations to support openness, transparency, and access to and the preservation of government information in Canada.

Read the full response here

Cuts to Statistics Canada are Harming Canadians

The CLA recently released a statement in response cuts at Statistics Canada. The below text is an abstract – please click here for the full statement.

“… Recent programme cuts and policy changes at Statistics Canada have made it more difficult than ever for Canadians to track changes to critical issues that affect their communities, such as unemployment rates or the education of our children. The replacement of the mandatory long-form census with the National Household Survey, at a significantly greater cost, and the cancellation of many social surveys has made it increasingly challenging, if not impossible, for municipalities, hospitals, schools, and government agencies to administer social programmes and to track their success. In some cases, municipalities are financing their own surveys to gather the critical data they once had access to through StatCan (see full article for reference). StatCan cuts and changes are continuing to impede effective planning for all agencies, making future programming a costly gamble. Additionally, with all levels of government focused on social and economic innovation, it is imperative that municipalities have the ability to look back on trends in order to plan for the future with reliable data…”

The Lyon Declaration

The Lyon Declaration on Access to Information and Development was launched at the IFLA World Library and Information Congress in Lyon, France, 15-22 August 2014. The Declaration focuses on the UN’s post-2015 development agenda, currently being developed, and includes important statements on the access to and the preservation of government information, including the recognition on behalf of signatories that:

Information intermediaries such as libraries, archives, civil society organisations (CSOs), community leaders and the media have the skills and resources to help governments, institutions and individuals communicate, organize, structure and understand data that is critical to development. They can do this by:

Preserving and ensuring ongoing access to cultural heritage, government records and information by the public, through the stewardship of national libraries and archives and other public heritage institutions.

The full text of the Declaration is available here. Please share widely.

Lyon

Government Information Day | Journée d’information gouvernementale

Save the date!

The University of Ottawa Library, with sponsorship from the Carleton University Library, is organizing a one-day conference, Government Information Day, scheduled to take place on Thursday, October 16th, 2014 at the University of Ottawa’s downtown campus.

Last year, Government Information Day was held at the University of Toronto and we would like to continue last year’s valuable discussion. We are currently in the process of developing the program. The broad theme will be focused around collaboration, with presentations and panels organized around two proposed subthemes: (i) preservation and access and (ii) open government.

Government Information Day is designed as a forum for keeping current on ongoing changes, but also for exploring how we can collaborate and respond to emerging and ongoing challenges and opportunities in the field of government information in Canada.

Stay tuned for more details and registration information.

If you have any questions, please, feel free to get in touch with us at gsg@uottawa.ca.

CDNGOVINFO

Marquez votre calendrier!

Organisée par la Bibliothèque de l’Université d’Ottawa, sous le patronage de la Bibliothèque de l’Université Carleton, la Journée d’information gouvernementale est une conférence d’une journée qui aura lieu le jeudi 16 octobre 2014 au campus principal de l’Université d’Ottawa.

L’an dernier, la Journée d’information gouvernementale a eu lieu à l’Université de Toronto et nous aimerions poursuivre la discussion entamée. Nous sommes à présent en voie d’élaborer le programme de la Journée. Le thème général sera axée sur la collaboration, et comprendra des présentations et des tables rondes structurées autour des deux sous-thèmes proposés: (i) la préservation et l’accès et (ii) la transparence gouvernementale.

La Journée d’information gouvernementale, est non seulement conçue comme une instance ouverte pour permettre de rester à l’affût des changements en cours, mais aussi pour examiner les façons de collaborer et de répondre aux défis et aux occasions qui se posent dans le domaine de l’information gouvernementale au Canada.

Des détails supplémentaires et de l’information relative à l’inscription seront bientôt disponibles.

Si vous avez des questions, n’hésitez pas à nous les faire parvenir à gsg@uottawa.ca.